7 Truths Writers (Probably) Won’t Admit Out Loud

Highlight the ones that apply to you and go confess your sins afterward.

#1 We stalk our readers on Goodreads to see what their progress updates say

But only because we value and crave feedback. Not because we’re paranoid. Why would we be paranoid?

#2 We don’t write as much as we pretend to

Raise your hand if you’ve tweeted #amwriting when you’ve done nothing of the sort. Good, now put it down and get to work.

#3 We do care about the money

Despite a hundred wise (and obnoxious) sayings to the contrary, most of us want to earn money through our writing, and it’s frustrating when sales are constantly flatlined. Not that I’m trying to be a Scrooge, but “I write because that’s who I am” doesn’t pay many expenses.

#4 We have at least one genre we hold a grudge against, though we’d never say so out loud

For me, it’s paranormal romance (sorry?). For you, it might be fantasy, and I forgive you.

#5 Knowing someone’s reading our book scares the sock monkeys out of us

Because a fraction of our soul is about to be either approved or rejected and if that doesn’t make you break a sweat, I don’t know what will.

#6 We easily get jealous of right-place-right-time authors who pop out of nowhere and make big bucks without visible effort

Is jealousy a fault? Yes. Is it natural? Also yes. But while we applaud the writers who find success through hard work, every now and then it genuinely feels like some people get it all handed to them and then some. (Oh, and is it a coincidence that those out-of-nowhere bestsellers tend to be the mediocre ones? Maybe. I’m trying not to be too salty here.)

#7 We joke about procrastination when it’s actually a legitimate problem

Every time I scroll down my Twitter feed I spot a few tweets making some snarky remarkย about procrastination. And yes, I do it too. But still…if we did something to solve the issue instead of seeking mutual giggles on social media, perhaps we’d have less to tweet about and more to publish? Oops.


Disclaimer: I wrote the list based on personal experience, so take it with a grain of salt. Got anything to confess or add? Drop a comment below. Subscribe and follow me on Twitter to receive your complimentary bunny in a teacup.

And as always, have a great day!

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17 thoughts on “7 Truths Writers (Probably) Won’t Admit Out Loud

  1. Okay I’ll be honest… Number 3 is kind of me. I do want to make money off my book (when it’s finished) what can I say. If money grew on trees I wouldn’t want it so much. Oh yeah and number 4 is totally me but I’d most likely vocalize it when I find out which genre I look down on (it probably whatever one annoys me the most)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. #5 is me. I wanted to jump off a bridge last time a friend gushed about my book and handed out copies in front of me. As it was, I smiled and slunk discreetly into a corner. ๐Ÿ˜€

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  3. #1 and #3 and #5, totally. I don’t “stalk” my readers, but I do like to do a quick check of their shelves/status and see if there’s been any activity involving something with my name attached. And I am kind of paranoid, because it’s one thing to hear somebody say, “I read this (my) book, and it was okay, just not my thing,” and another completely to hear, “Wow, this was terrible.” Luckily, most negative reviews consist of “it just wasn’t for me” or “I’m just not a fan of this style/genre”, but I know I would have a nervous breakdown if I ever came across a truly scathing review. I actually decided not to write really awful reviews on my own blog — unless the book truly called for it, due to reinforcing prejudices or discrimination or something that just shouldn’t be done in this day and age. Because as an author myself, I know how I’d feel if somebody ripped apart my work simply because it wasn’t their “thing.”

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  4. I haven’t published my book so most of these don’t apply to me? But I feel as if they might in the future.

    “We do care about money” So true! You guys have to eat after all.

    Number 7 will always be accurate. Always.

    Number 6 must be true. some of the authors I follow on twitter say “all reading is good reading.”

    I get that they were defending a fellow author and trying to rejecting bookish snobbery, but all reading can’t be good reading.

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  5. An excellent list! I try to avoid procrastination as much as possible these days, if I feel it creeping in and tempting me to scroll Facebook then I go off and do something practical that gives me the chance to hash out ideas in my head while I work! ๐Ÿ˜

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      1. Apologies for taking so long to reply, but for some reason my phone and laptop aren’t very well sychronised at the moment and I’m not getting all my notifications!! Back to the matter at hand, I believe every writer has their own way of doing things and it’s very easy to get distracted by cute animal videos or an interesting post related to writing… ๐Ÿ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

  6. #2 is definitely a confession of mine.

    My grudge is dystopian. ๐Ÿ˜„

    #6 mayyy be a legitimate problem for most of us. *cough* (It’s true though… o.o)

    I try not to joke about procrastination because it IS a legitimate problem for me… I might complain about it though. ๐Ÿ˜„ But yes, solving it…

    Many of the others don’t apply to me because I’m not published yet, but excellent post! And hilarious, as always. ๐Ÿ˜‰ And so true.

    I always wondered if authors are secretly watching my reading progress! :O Bwahaha. ๐Ÿ˜›

    Liked by 1 person

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